Fluorine Informaiton

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Fluorine

Other Names

 

Chemical Formula

F2

CAS Number

7782-41-4

Industry Uses

Steel-making; Pharmaceuticals; Chemistry Laboratories

Health Risks

Irritation of eyes, skin, and mucous membranes; Chemical burns; Death

Vapor Pressure

760 mmHg at 85 K

Water Solubility

Reacts with water

Flammability

Non-Flammable but Strong Oxidizer

Odor

Pungent, sharp, choking

Fluorine MSDS

What is Fluorine?

Fluorine is a non-metallic diatomic gas that is a trace element. It is a toxic, pale-yellow gas and is extremely reactive. Reactions of fluorine with alkali metals cause explosions. Fluorite, the primary mineral source of fluorine, is used extensively in steel-making. Many pharmaceuticals contain fluorine. Fluorine reacts with water and is corrosive to most common materials. It is an oxidizer and will react enough with most combustible materials to cause ignition. Under prolonged exposure to fire or heat, containers of fluorine may rupture and rocket.

Fluorine Exposure and Health Risks

Fluorine is toxic and deadly by inhalation and skin absorption. Low concentrations will cause chemical burns. Chronic absorption can cause osteosclerosis and calcification of ligaments. As an oxidizer, fluorine provides great danger if it should ignite, causing a fire. It can also cause damage in occurrence of explosion.

Regulations

The table below summarizes the most-recent exposure limits.

Limit/Level

Type

Organization

1.7 ppm

AEGL-1 (8 hrs)

EPA

2.3 ppm

AEGL-2 (8 hrs)

EPA

36 ppm

AEGL-3 (10 min)

EPA

5.7 ppm

AEGL-3 (8 hrs)

EPA

0.1 ppm

TWA (8 hrs)

NIOSH

0.1 ppm

TWA

OSHA

Sources: NIOSH, OSHA, EPA

Measuring Fluorine

Fluorine concentration in the air can be measured in units of parts per million (ppm). We carry portable and fixed Fluorine monitors and kits, and all of our Fluorine products can be viewed HERE.

Contact us for help choosing the right monitor for your application